Pitching Drills (Kindle Book)

Softball Pitching Drills

Pitching Drills By Gary Leland

My first Kindle book is short and sweet.

It seems like a lifetime ago, but I still remember when I first started coaching my daughters fastpitch softball team. I had played a little baseball growing up, and some slowpitch softball along the way too, but I knew nothing about coaching girls fastpitch softball.

I soon found out two things:
1. Fastpitch softball was a sport of its own. While so many thing are the same, there are many things that are different in fastpitch softball than baseball, or slowpitch softball.

2. I knew nothing about coaching girls at all. Playing sports had not really taught me how to coach, and it defiantly did not teach me anything about coaching girls.

I do know that one of the main things new coaches meed, and are looking for is information. This book is my attempt to provide another source for that information.

While I admit I did not come up with all these pitching drills. Many of them have probably been used for years, and years. What I did was find many of the great pitching drills I used with my pitchers. Then I wrote them in an easy to understand format. Trying to make them easy to learn and use.

While this may be a guide for coaches to help their young pitchers, this is also be a great resource for parents hoping to help their daughters become better fastpitch softball pitchers.

As I said before it is short and sweet. That is why it is only ninety nine cents.

To Purchase this book on Amazon.com CLICK HERE

Creating Front Side Resistance

Creating Front Side Resistance by Sherry Werner, PhD

Objective: A hitter must create resistance on the front side so that the hands can move quickly to the ball. The same applies in pitching. A pitcher must create front side (stride leg) resistance in the order for the throwing arm to move quickly through the windmill motion. The purpose of the leap series is to allow an athlete to feel what it is to create front side resistance in pitching.

Drill: The leap series consists of 3 drills:

(1) leap and stick: the pitcher starts in a balanced position on her dominant side (push/drag leg) foot. With the opposite leg (stride leg) off the ground, the pitcher leaps out (not up!), from the push/drag foot, and lands on the stride leg foot. The landing should be on the ball of the foot and held for 5 sec.

(2) leap and hop: the pitcher starts in a balanced position on her dominant side (push/drag leg) foot. With the opposite leg (stride leg) off the ground, the pitcher leaps out (not up!), from the push/drag foot, lands on the stride leg foot and then immediately hops straight up and lands again on the stride foot. The landings should be on the ball of the foot and the hop does not need to be high but does need to be quick.

(3) leap and push back: the pitcher starts in a balanced position on her dominant side (push/drag leg) foot. With the opposite leg (stride leg) off the ground, the pitcher leaps out (not up!), from the push/drag foot, lands on the stride foot, and then immediately hops back to the push/drag foot. The landings should be on the ball of the foot and the hop backward does not need to be long but does need to be quick.

Each of the three drills should be repeated 3 times and followed by 2 fastballs in order to transfer the feel of the drill to the pitch.

Reacting to Throws as a First Baseman

Reacting to Throws as a First Baseman by Leah O’Brien Amico “Olympian”

Objective: To react quickly to balls thrown to first base by infielders and becoming confident in fielding bad throws.

Set-Up: First baseman sets up in her ready position with a coach/teammate throwing the ball from different positions. The first baseman would drop step with her right foot (chest open to the field) and run back to get to the base, putting her foot on the middle of the inside of the base. The foot placed on the bag should be the left foot for